Investigating Vietnamese Identity With Karma And Her Status As An Important Superhero

Over the past few decades, Vietnam has become one of the most revitalised countries in the world. The Vietnam War left its mark and the political landscape changed forever. A comic character that represents the struggles of the Vietnamese is Karma. She was among the boat people who fled the country after the rise of Communism. As a culturally important superhero, Karma is a representation of Vietnamese resilience. A founding member of the New Mutants, Karma is one of the most believable X-Men characters. Continue reading “Investigating Vietnamese Identity With Karma And Her Status As An Important Superhero”

How Mantis Offers A Different Take On The Chosen One Trope As The Celestial Madonna

The Guardians of The Galaxy film franchise has been responsible for introducing a lot of obscure comic characters to a mainstream audience. The likes of Drax, Rocket Racoon and Groot have all benefited from the spotlight. Mantis is another superhero that’s had some great exposure, though the film version differs greatly to the comic portrayal. In the comics, Mantis is linked to The Avengers and her backstory makes her one of the most intriguing female superheroes in the Marvel Universe. Continue reading “How Mantis Offers A Different Take On The Chosen One Trope As The Celestial Madonna”

Cheshire And The Complexity Of Motherhood

Comics are one of the best mediums to discover characters that come from a diverse background. There are plenty of ethnic superheroes to appreciate, just as there are compelling villains with complex motivations. A villain that deserves some spotlight is Cheshire. As a woman with Vietnamese heritage, Jade Nguyen grew up with nothing and transformed herself into one of the deadliest assassins in the DC Universe. An enemy of the Teen Titans, Cheshire’s murderous tendencies are contrasted with the love she has for her daughter Lian. Her complexity makes her more than a one-dimensional villain. Continue reading “Cheshire And The Complexity Of Motherhood”