The Weird Tales of William Hope Hodgson: Here Be Monsters

What would you define as weird fiction? Supernatural creatures? Occult happenings in the dead of night? In the realm of weird fiction nothing is off limits. The genre has been popularised by writing greats such as H.P Lovecraft, Algernon Blackwood and Arthur Machen. A name that deserves to be mentioned alongside them is William Hope Hodgson, an author who blended the bizarre with the banal.

The Weird Tales of William Hope Hodgson feature ten short stories that delve into the horror of the unknown. I was given a free copy of the book in exchange for an honest review. Readers with weak constitutions take heed. Here be monsters. Continue reading “The Weird Tales of William Hope Hodgson: Here Be Monsters”

Cursed Comics Cavalcade Review: An Impressive Collection Of Horror-Themed Stories

Haloween is the time of ghosts and monsters, a time for people to enjoy the spooky side of life. For Halloween 2018, I’m reviewing Cursed Comics Cavalcade, a collection of stories that celebrate the paranormal. The collection has ten stories that feature iconic superheroes like Batman and lesser known characters like Etrigan. Each story has a different creative team, so I’m reviewing each one in order.
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Day Of The Red Sun Published In Sky’s The Limit Anthology

Over the last few years I’ve come to enjoy writing short stories and I’ve challenged myself to send out as many as possible to different publishers. So, it’s always good when a publisher comes back and says they like your work. I’m happy to say that my latest short story Day of The Red Sun is available in the Colp: Sky’s The Limit anthology. Published by Colp and supported by Gypsum Sound Tales, the anthology contains twelve short stories that deal with humanity’s fascination with the air. Continue reading “Day Of The Red Sun Published In Sky’s The Limit Anthology”

Corrido De La Sangre Review: A Haunting Tableau Of Mexican Folklore And Violence

Musicals have the power to connect with people, whether it be through song or the subject matter of the performance. Some musicals shine a light on the darker side of humanity, which is the case with Corrido de la Sangre, performed by the Tiger Lillies. The band, considered to be the innovators of Brechtian punk cabaret, are known for their macabre lyrics and content. The musical took place at HOME in Manchester, and here are my thoughts on what was a haunting performance.

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Abbott #3 Review: A Fast-Paced Issue That Ramps Up The Supernatural Tension And Intrigue

Saladin Ahmed’s Abbott series has been one of the exciting original stories of 2018, with its focus on blaxploitation and political upheaval in 1970s Detroit. The momentum continues to build in issue three, as Elena Abbott looks to unravel a mystery that’s becoming increasingly supernatural. The story picks up directly from the second issue, with Abbott trying to escape a murderous centaur that’s determined to cut her investigation short.

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The Common Good Review: A Cyberpunk Retelling Of 1984 With Relatable Themes

In the modern day, technology is a common part of every day life, to the point that many people would be lost without it. Social media is a major presence, connecting everyone at all times, though it can be a double-edged sword. What would happen if your privacy was invaded and you were watched 24/7 by the kind of technology that you placed your faith in? That question forms the basis of Stefan Gutternigh’s The Common Good. The cyberpunk comic is set in 2035, where a totalitarian world government regulates the lives of its citizens by monitoring them. Themes of isolation, loss of privacy and societal manipulation are explored in a chilling tale. Gutternigh sent a copy of The Common Good to The Comic Vault in exchange for an honest review.

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Abbott #2 Review: Murder And Mayhem In The Motor City

Some of the most interesting stories feature strong POC protagonists, which is why I’ve enjoyed reading Saladin Ahmed’s Abbott series, which features tough as nails reporter Elena Abbott. Set in 1970s Detroit, Ahmed’s comic weaves together occult and noir themes to create a political thriller with memorable characters. Abbott #2 picks up from where the first issue started and it’s safe to say there’s a mystery that needs to be solved.

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The Black Monday Murders Vol 1: All Hail God Mammon Review: Money Is The Root Of All Power

The desire to earn more money is felt by many people, whether they want to become successful or afford new things. Currency makes the world go round and it could be argued that money is the root of all evil, but what if money was the root of all power for some? What if the urge to accumulate more wealth became a visceral need to dominate your fellow man? Such questions form the basis of Jonathan Hickman’s The Black Monday Murders Vol 1: All Hail, God Mammon. Money and blood go hand in hand and no price is too high for the characters of this dark and disturbing graphic novel.

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Hillbilly: Volume 2 Review: An Awesome Tale Of Appalachian Folklore

Fairytales are one of the oldest forms of storytelling being passed down from generation to generation. This ties into folklore and how it can influence entire communities. It’s why I’m always interested in reading stories that are inspired by fairytales and Eric Powell’s Hillbilly series is a great example. Hillbilly: Volume 2 continues the exploits of supernatural wanderer, Rondel, who battles against witches and monsters in the Appalachian wilderness. Powell combines fairytales with southern folklore to create a series that’s worth reading.

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The Pale Review: Birds Of A Feather Are Damned Together

Birds symbolise a variety of things, from the freedom of the sky, to a young person asserting their independence. Birds play a big part in Sanders and Jay Fabares’ The Pale, which sees avian enthusiast Franklin ‘Fink’ Ink confront his past in the Arizona desert. Ink also works for the FBI as a linguist and it puts him into contact with the sheriff of a small town. But Fink is hiding something crucial about himself that could make or break the case. The Comic Vault was sent The Pale #1 and #2 in exchange for an honest review.

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